The Pros of Progressive Lenses

The Pros of Progressive Lenses

Multifocal lenses have made everyday life much easier for people over forty. Bifocals were invented sometime in the 1700s, but trifocals and eventually progressive lenses were later created to give wearers even more functionality. The options are great, but making the choice can be difficult!

If you need multifocal lenses to provide you more than one power, progressive lenses may be a perfect fit. They have many benefits and can work in almost any setting.

Here are some things to consider for your progressive lenses.

How Progressive Lenses Work
Progressive lenses are called “progressive” because they gradually change from one magnification to a stronger one at the bottom of the lens. They progress from a distance vision prescription to an intermediate and then a near-field one. This means that the wearer can look up to the horizon in the upper portion of the lens and see distances clearly, use the middle of the lens to look around their intermediate space, and view reading materials and close up objects through the bottom of the lens. This use of progressive lenses becomes second nature after some adjustment.

Are Progressive Lenses Better than Bifocals?
Many people prefer progressive lenses over bifocals for two reasons. First, bifocals only have two prescription powers. They usually address a farther distance and a close-up reading view. Either an intermediate distance or a certain distance will not be completely clear. Second, some people are distracted by the “image jump” that they see when looking through bifocals. This is caused by the abrupt line where the inset meets the rest of the lens. Some people love bifocals and see no added benefits from progressive lenses, but most people like the versatility of progressive lenses.

Additional Benefits of Modern Progressive Lenses
Multifocal lenses that are not progressive sometimes don’t fit well within a certain frame size. Because lenses have to be cut to fit the frame, the reading portion can end up too big or too small compared to the lens size. Short corridor progressive lenses address this by scaling the reading zones into a more compact area. This means wearers still have their pick of frames and eyeglass shapes.

In addition, specialty progressive eyewear exists to meet certain needs. Computer eyewear can be a great option for people who work at a desktop setting. These lenses do not need the addition of a distance vision section. This means that they allow more room for a close distance focus, and then the rest of the lens is created for the intermediate field. With a computer screen sitting at arm’s length, reading materials up close, and walls at an intermediate distance, these lenses help maximize the eyewear for indoor occupational settings.

Nobody will notice! Some people believe there is a stigma with bifocals because they perceive them as glasses only for senior citizens. Many people even put off getting multifocal lenses because they don’t want to admit that they need them. Progressive lenses help this issue for some people because there is not a visible line like with bifocals. It is unusual for someone to notice that the wearer has progressive lenses unlike the ability to see bifocal lines.

If you have any questions about how progressive lenses can help your eyes see as clearly and comfortably as possible, speak with an optician. There are many options and we can help you narrow down the possibilities so you can make an informed decision.

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